Activity

Historical Central Park

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Photo ofHistorical Central Park Photo ofHistorical Central Park Photo ofHistorical Central Park

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Trail stats

Distance
2.91 mi
Elevation gain
102 ft
Technical difficulty
Moderate
Elevation loss
49 ft
Max elevation
124 ft
TrailRank 
27
Min elevation
46 ft
Trail type
One Way
Coordinates
152
Uploaded
November 5, 2019
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124 ft
46 ft
2.91 mi

near San Juan Hill, New York (United States)

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Trail photos

Photo ofHistorical Central Park Photo ofHistorical Central Park Photo ofHistorical Central Park

Itinerary description

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Tour of a small part of the popular New York park with stops at important landmarks that will help us understand the history and culture of the United States.

Waypoints

PictographWaypoint Altitude 68 ft
Photo ofBalto Statue

Balto Statue

The statue of Balto has been a favorite for a century. It pays tribute to the famous sled dog that fought against the conditions of the tundra in Alaska and helped save American children. In January 1925, a deadly diphtheria epidemic threatened the children of the Alaskan city, Nome. The medicine to stop the outbreak was in Anchorage, almost a thousand miles away. Twenty teams of sled dogs transmitted the medicine through blinding snow and temperatures that reached 40 degrees below zero. Balto, a robust Siberian husky, led his team in the last 53 treacherous miles, reaching Nome only 20 hours later. Newspapers and radio from around the world followed the walk, fascinated by the brave team whose efforts eventually helped end the epidemic. Balto became an instant and favorite media hero, and New Yorkers rushed to show their support. The bronze sculpture, created by Frederick GR Roth, was dedicated that same year on December 17.

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PictographWaypoint Altitude 86 ft
Photo ofRichard Morris Hunt Memorial

Richard Morris Hunt Memorial

This striking monument on the eastern perimeter of the park pays tribute to Richard Morris Hunt, the first American to study at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris. It was erected in 1898 by MAS (Municipal Art Society of New York). The American architect was one of the founders of the AIA (American Institute of Architects) and presided since 1888.

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PictographWaypoint Altitude 58 ft
Photo ofPilgrim Hill

Pilgrim Hill

It was sculpted by John Quincy Adams Ward, and given to Central Park by the New England Society in 1885. It is one of the best places to sleigh ride in the park. In addition, in the warmer months, it becomes a popular place to picnic and rest. The Pilgrim Fathers (in English, Pilgrim Fathers) was an English religious group formed at the end of the 16th century who, being dissatisfied with the political-religious environment in their country, decided to emigrate. The Pilgrim Fathers left the port of Plymouth (England) on the Mayflower ship on August 15, 1620 and, crossing the Atlantic Ocean. They were gathered by the Puritan church of Calvinist wedge and took refuge from religious persecutions and political instability in Europe. The Pilgrim Fathers denomination to designate these settlers arose in the 19th century, associating them with a biblical passage.

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PictographWaypoint Altitude 92 ft
Photo ofSeventh Regiment Memorial

Seventh Regiment Memorial

It is an outdoor bronze sculpture in honor of the members of that regiment whose lives were lost during the Civil War. It was created by John Quincy Adams Ward and Richard Morris Hunt designed the base.

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PictographWaypoint Altitude 91 ft
Photo ofStrawberry Fields Photo ofStrawberry Fields

Strawberry Fields

It is the name given to the central area of Central Park in New York (USA) in memory of John Lennon, who was killed in the vicinity of the park. In life he used to walk around that place, he said it was his favorite. The name of the garden is inspired by the Beatles song «Strawberry Fields Forever». Strawberry Fields is an elevated area of one hectare, in front of the Dakota Apartments, at the intersection of Central Park West and 72nd Street, where Lennon was killed on December 8, 1980. Five years later, his widow, Yoko Ono held a ceremony on his behalf with the assistance of international diplomats, most of whose countries sent gifts to this garden.

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PictographCave Altitude 88 ft
Photo ofThe Ramble Cave Photo ofThe Ramble Cave

The Ramble Cave

The Ramble is a tree-lined path located along the lake in Central Park, initially intended for a natural landscape. While building the road in the 1850s, urban planners found a large amount of land. Upon unearthing it, they discovered a cavity in the ground where they had exactly planned a walking path. Town planners did not think that the cavity fit the aspect of The Ramble they had imagined, and had no accessibility. Whereupon, they placed several large rocks around the cavity, with a natural-looking arch. They built a staircase of rough stones that led from the lake to the newly formed cave, making it accessible to the public. After construction, it became an extremely popular tourist destination. Although it was meant to be an oasis away from the city, The Ramble Cave unfortunately became a site for frequent crimes in Central Park. In 1904, a suicidal man was found shot in the chest near the steps. In the 1930s, the entrance to the lake was closed with bricks, while the arch was completely clogged and looked like a hill. The stairs, however, are still visible today.

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PictographWaypoint Altitude 110 ft
Photo ofAlexander Hamilton Monument Photo ofAlexander Hamilton Monument

Alexander Hamilton Monument

It was created by Carl Conrads. Hamilton's son, John C. Hamilton, commissioned Conrads to sculpt this statue, which was dedicated on November 22, 1880 and donated to the city. Conrads used the Hamilton bust created by sculptor Giuseppe Ceracchi as a model for Hamilton's head. Alexander Hamilton was one of the founding fathers of the United States. He was an influential interpreter and promoter of the Constitution of the United States, as well as the founder of the nation's financial system, the Federalist Party, the United States Coast Guard and the newspaper The New York Post. He lived near Manhattan, in Hamilton Grange, when he died in 1804.

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PictographWaypoint Altitude 125 ft
Photo ofSeneca Village Site Photo ofSeneca Village Site

Seneca Village Site

It was an African-American settlement in the district of Manhattan, New York, which was inside the current Central Park. It was founded in 1825 by free blacks, and was the first such community in the city. At the height of the boom, the community had three churches, a school and two cemeteries, as well as 264 residents. Later, several other minorities arrived in the village, including Irish and German immigrants. The village of Seneca disappeared in 1857, when through an eminent domain the villagers of the area were ordered to leave and their houses were demolished for the construction of Central Park.

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