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Robs: Rock Walk 5 - Gibraltar

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Trail stats

Distance
6.23 mi
Elevation gain
2,526 ft
Technical difficulty
Moderate
Elevation loss
2,526 ft
Max elevation
1,382 ft
TrailRank 
62 4.7
Min elevation
65 ft
Trail type
One Way
Moving time
2 hours 26 minutes
Time
4 hours 16 minutes
Coordinates
1746
Uploaded
June 7, 2020
Recorded
May 2020
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1,382 ft
65 ft
6.23 mi

near Gibraltar (Gibraltar)

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Trail photos

Photo ofRobs: Rock Walk 5 - Gibraltar Photo ofRobs: Rock Walk 5 - Gibraltar Photo ofRobs: Rock Walk 5 - Gibraltar

Itinerary description

Another great journey through time across the rock if you have the time with magnificent views.
The trail starts on Referendum Steps just to get the body warmed up leading to Devils Gap Battery which has panoramic views of the bay of Gibraltar.
From here we ascend to Prince Ferdinand’s Battery which is at the base of our climb up the Charles’s V wall breaking out at the Apes Den on the Upper Rock.
We continue our adventure picking up the Douglas path where I met up with one of the rocks residents a lonely Barbary Partridge just strolling along the path towards me. I stopped and watched as he walked straight past me without a care in the world.
At the end of the Douglas path we continue down the road until we reach St Michael’s Cave where we pick up the trail leading to Jews Gate and the start of Med Steps in an anti-clockwise direction.
We continue our journey along the picturesque path enjoying panoramic views along the eastern side of the rock.
The trail ends with a nice little climb which brings us out in the vicinity of Break Neck Battery to the North which is located on MOD property and to the South Lord Airey’s and Ohara’s Battery’s located on GoG Property. Continuing along the road towards St Michael’s Cave again we take the lower road towards Prince Ferdinand’s Battery and the start of our second ascent of the Charles V wall. From here we descend Northwards towards Princess Carolines Battery, Moorish Castle and the completion of our adventure.

A little history explained below:

Referéndum Steps:
Devil's Gap Road (AKA Referendum Steps or Escalera del Monte in Spanish and Llanito) is a pedestrian street with painted steps in Gibraltar's Upper Town district. The steps climb from Flat Bastion Road to the start of Devil's Gap Footpath and Baca's Passage.
The Union Flag and Queen Elizabeth's royal cypther, EIIR, are painted onto the steps. They were originally painted by residents during the build up to Gibraltar's first sovereignty referendum held on 10 September 1967, when Gibraltarians first rejected Spanish sovereignty. The steps were last repainted in August 2011 by a group of youngsters following a Facebook campaign called "Repainting Our History".

Devils Gap Battery
Called by the Spanish, Punta del Diablo English: Devil's Point, Devils Gap Battery stands on the escarpment above the city looking out across the bay at a height of 130 metres (430 ft) above sea level.
During the 1779-1783 Great Siege of Gibraltar it mounted at least one mortar, possibly more.
In 1878 two RML 9 inch 12 ton guns were proposed and installed at the battery in June 1881, but later dismounted in 1900.
In July 1896 work started on a new platform to the north of the battery for two QF 12 pounder 12 cwt naval Mark I guns which were ready on 31 August 1896.
In June 1900, it was proposed to mount two BL 6 inch Mk VII naval guns on central pivot Mark II mountings with a range of 5,500 metres (6,000 yd) capable of bearing on land batteries and on the bay. These were installed in 1902, with magazines and shelters added in October 1903.
In August 1917 one of the guns fired upon and sunk a German submarine travelling on the surface close to Algeciras, which was the only action seen by Gibraltar's coastal defences during World War I.
The guns were manned in 1936 during the Spanish Civil War while Campamento and La Línea de la Concepción were being bombarded by Spanish naval units.
During World War II the guns were the first to fire.
In 1954 the battery ceased its role of close defence examination but the 6-inch guns were retained and are still in place today.

Lord Airey’s and Ohara’s Battery’s

Lord Airey's Battery is an artillery battery in the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar. It is located near the southern end of the Upper Rock Nature Reserve, just north of O'Hara's Battery. It was named after the Governor of Gibraltar, General Sir Richard Airey. Construction of the battery was completed in 1891. The first gun mounted on the battery was a 6-inch breech loading gun, which was replaced with a 9.2-inch Mark X BL gun by 1900. The gun at the battery was last fired in the 1970s. In 1997, it was discovered that Lord Airey's Shelter, adjacent to Lord Airey's Battery, was the site chosen for a covert World War II operation that entailed construction of a cave complex in the Rock of Gibraltar, to serve as an observation post. The battery is listed with the Gibraltar Heritage Trust.

O'Hara's Battery is an artillery battery in the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar. It is located at the highest point of the Rock of Gibraltar, near the southern end of the Upper Rock Nature Reserve, in close proximity to Lord Airey's Battery. It was constructed in 1890 at the former site of a watchtower that had earned the name O'Hara's Folly. The battery and tower were both named after the Governor of Gibraltar Charles O'Hara. The first gun mounted on the battery was a 6-inch breech loading gun, which was replaced with a 9.2 inch Mark X BL gun in 1901. The battery was in use during World War II and was last fired during training exercises in 1976. O'Hara's Battery has been refurbished and is open to the public. The battery and its associated works are listed with the Gibraltar Heritage Trust.

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Comments  (1)

  • king javaly Nov 20, 2023

    I have followed this trail  verified  View more

    Amazing place..

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